Studio

 

 

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SM58 with wires

PRODUCER SPOTLIGHT: Andrew Hunt

Having recently won a prestigious MPG Award, Andrew Hunt is riding a wave of success built from the ground up. We caught up with Andrew to learn more about his story progressing from a multi-instrumentalist to a talented producer and engineer. Through sharing his journey, it’s plain to see how a real passion for music […]
Studio

Crossing the Channel with Producer Shel Talmy

Andrew Anderson talks to producer Shel Talmy about recording The Kinks, The Who, The Damned and Bowie and how he really got the crunchy guitar sound on You Really Got Me… Everyone in pro audio has a favourite-sounding record. This is not to be confused with their favourite song – that’s something totally different. No, […]
Studio
Microphone on Stage

Engineer Spotlight: Olga Fitzroy

As an audio engineer, frequently turning your head to a wide variety of musical genres and productions comes with the territory. In the following Engineer Spotlight feature, we speak to recent MPG Engineer of the Year winner, Olga Fitzroy who we learn is no stranger to applying her skills across a broad spectrum. From assisting […]
Studio

Shure Interviews Multi-Award Winning Mix Engineer Cenzo Townshend

It’s not everyday you get to interview someone at the absolute top of his game. If you don’t already know his name, Cenzo Townshend is a legendary British Mix Engineer and winner of Mix Engineer of the Year at the Music Producers Guild in both 2009 and 2010. Like many of his peers he started […]
Live

Guitars On Stage and in the Studio: Quiet Is the New Loud

Guitarists have a reputation for major contribution to volume wars on-stage and in the studio. This reputation is perhaps personified in that famous – and often over-quoted – line from the movie Spinal Tap. We all know the line — “this one goes up to 11.” Brilliant… Seriously, though, how many times do you see […]
Live

The Secret to Better Audio: Inputs Are More Important than Outputs

Here’s a tip you can put into action today that will immediately improve your audio endeavours across the board: Inputs are more important than outputs. That’s right, it’s simple science really: what goes in must come out. Or put bluntly: garbage in, garbage out. So, no matter whether you’re recording music, running a live sound gig, […]
Live
The Competition’s Four Runners-Up

Microphone Directionality and Polar Pattern Basics

Microphones are used to capture or reinforce a particular sound. The challenge for an engineer is to select the right microphone for their application and apply the appropriate mic technique to capture the desired sound source and reject unwanted background noise or feedback. As part of the selection process, understanding the fundamentals of how a […]
Live

Specialist Polar Patterns: Hypercardioid and Subcardioid

As briefly described in our post on microphone basics, mic directionality can be classified as three distinct types: omnidirectional, unidirectional, and bi-directional. Within these categories, there are a number of different directional patterns plotted in graphs known as polar-patterns; the most commonly known types are cardioid and supercardioid. For a large number of common applications, these 2 guys […]
Studio
Microphone on Stage

Recording Drums part 6 – bringing it all together

Welcome to the final part in our series. To finish our drum recording tuition, Jay walks trough the process of bringing an entire kit together. The first step toward a more harmonious final result is reverb. Reverb is important because we expect to hear music in some kind of space; if the final result is too dry, […]
Studio
Microphone on Stage

Recording Drums part 5 – phase cancellation

Welcome back. Today we’re going to look at one of the most important factors in bringing a drum kit recording together. In any recording where multiple microphones are used to capture a single sound source, the phase relationship between each microphone is critical. In particular we need to pay close attention to the relationship between […]